Featured Folder: “God Made Animals”

What a wonderful variety of animals God made for us to enjoy! Huge elephants, tiny catepillars. Animals that snort or growl, chirp or bark, buzz or mew. Animals that fly or crawl, tunnel or swim, leap or creep. They are the other living creatures that inhabit the earth that God made for us.

Theme Scripture: “God made the . . . animals.” Genesis 1:25 (ICB) Help the children remember this verse by asking them to act like lions when they say it. Then say it again, acting like monkeys. Ask them to say it again, acting like frogs. Continue as long as they are interested.

Unit Goals: By the end of this unit, the child should:
• Know that God made animals.
• Feel thankful and joyful.
• Thank God for making animals.

Bible Stories
• Creation (Genesis 1:20-25) Focus: God Made Animals.
• Adam Names the Animals (Genesis 2:18-20) Focus: God made animals and let God name them.
• God Talks to Job (Job 38:1-3; 39; 42:1-3) Focus: God made animals.
• Solomon Knows About Animals (I Kings 4:26-34; 10:22-29) Focus: We can learn about the animals God made.

Art Activities:
-Paper Plate Fish
-Lollipop Giraffe
-Thumbprint birds
-Animal Prints

Science Activities:
-Animal Discovery
-Whose Ears?
-Animal Tracks
-Fast and Slow

Cooking:
-Animal Crackers
-Animal Cookies
-Cracker Duck
-Bananapillars

Music & Movement:
-Zoo Walk
-Monkeys at the Zoo
-The Keeper at the Zoo

Games:
-The Memory Game
-Duck, Duck, Goose
-Two by Two

This folder is designed to give you the ideas you need to teach a unit about the animals Glod made. Mix and match the activities you want with the stories suggested, and enjoy!

BUY PDF DOWNLOAD of “God Made the Animals” $2.99
(sold as downloads only, print not available) Your purchase includes permission to reproduce the pages for ministry purposes at a single location, not for distribution to non-purchasers.

LEARN MORE about the Bible Learning Series

DOWNLOAD the Scope and Sequence for the whole series

Featured Bible Learning Folder: “I Help”

16-1-72

Young children want to try doing grown-up things. They are eager to help. It makes them feel significant and useful. It helps them feel like an important part of the family or class. Teach young children that they can help do many things, and God is happy when we help each other.

Theme Scripture: “Help those who are weak.” I Thessalonians 5:14 (ICB) Help the children remember this verse by asking them to repeat it after you with simple hand motions. (shown on first page)

Unit Goals: By the end of this unit, the child should:
• Know that God is happy when children help.
• Want to help.
• Help in class and at home.

Bible Stories
• The Good Samaritan (Luke 10:30-35) Focus: The Samaritan man helped the hurt man.
• Building the Tabernacle (Exodus 35:30-36:2) Focus: People used their different God-given skills to help build the worship house.
• Peter and John Heal a Lame Man (Acts 3:1-11) Focus: Peter and John stopped to help a lame man.
• Filing the Oil Jars (2 Kings 4:1-7) Focus: Two boys helped their mother.

Art Activities:
-Penny Banks
-Money Prints
-Bow Necklace
-Wrapping Paper

Science Activities:
-Mixing Colors
-Matching Patterns
-Sorting Coins
-Big and Little, Heavy and Light

Cooking:
-Bean Soup Mix
-Crunchy Oat Cookies
-Cinnamon Crescents
-Coin Cookies

Music & Movement:
-Give a Little
-Jonathan Gave
-One Penny, Two
-We Are Cheerful Givers

Games:
-Pass the Gift
-Who’s Got the Penny?
-What’s in My Gift Basket?
-What Do They Need?

This folder is designed to give you the ideas you need to teach a unit about helping. Mix and match the activities you want with the stories suggested, and enjoy!

BUY PDF DOWNLOAD FOR “I Help”  $2.99
(sold as downloads only, print not available) Your purchase includes permission to reproduce the pages for ministry purposes at a single location, not for distribution to non-purchasers.

LEARN MORE about the Bible Learning Series

DOWNLOAD the Scope and Sequence for the whole series

Featured Folder: “God Made Land, Sea and Sky”

bls22_front_150

A young child’s interests center around things that are familiar to him. Exploring God’s creation uses the child’s natural curiosity about his world to help him learn more about God. Teach the children that God made the land, sea, and sky.

Theme Scripture: “in the begining, God made the sky and the earth.” Genesis 1:1 (ICB) Help the children remember this vers by asking them to repeat it after with simple hand motions. (shown on first page)

Unit Goals: By the end of this unit, the child should:
• Know that God made the land, sea, and sky
• Feel thankful and joyful
• Thank God for making the earth, sea, and sky.

Bible Stories
• Creation (Genesis 1:1-10) Focus: God made the land, sea, and sky
• Lot Chooses Land (Genesis 13:5-18) Focus: God made the different kinds of land from which Lot chose.
• The Sun Stands Still (Joshua 10:6-14) Focus: God made the sun, and it obeys him.
• Catching Lots of Fish (Luke 5:1-11) Focus: God made the lake where Jesus’ friends caught fish.

Art Activities:
-Soap Flake Sea
-Watercolor Sky with Cotton Ball Clouds
-Play Dough Mountains
-Beach Picture

Science Activities:
-Where Do They Go?
-Digging
-Making Waves
-Cloud Shapes

Cooking:
-Cloud Crackers
-Mountain Rolls
-Cloud Gelatin
-Dirt Pudding

Music & Movement:
-In the Beginning
-God Made Land
-March Across the Land

Games:
-Over Land, Over Sea
-Catch a Falling Star
-I Spy

This folder is designed to give you the ideas you need to teach a unit about God’s creation of land, sea, and sky. Mix and match the activities you want with the stories suggested, and enjoy!

BUY PDF DOWNLOAD FOR “God Made Land, Sea and Sky”  $2.99
(sold as downloads only, print not available) Your purchase includes permission to reproduce the pages for ministry purposes at a single location, not for distribution to non-purchasers.

LEARN MORE about the Bible Learning Series

DOWNLOAD the Scope and Sequence for the whole series

Featured Folder: “Jesus is God’s Son”

BLS07 page 1

One of the most familiar and popular Bible stories for most young children is the story of baby Jesus. There are stars and angels, shepherds and animals. There are wise men and gifts. There’s a husband and wife. and most important of all, there’s a very special baby. Teach young children that baby Jesus is God’s gift to us. He is God’s own Son.

Unit Goals:

By the end of this unit, the child should:

  • Know that God sent his Son, Jesus, to the earth as a baby.
  • Feel happy and thankful. Feel loving toward baby Jesus.
  • Thank god for sending baby Jesus

Bible Stories:

  • Gabriel Comes to Mary (Luke 1:26-38)
  • No Room at the Inn (Luke 2:1-7)
  • Angels and Shepherds (Luke 2:8-20)
  • Wise Men Visit Jesus (Matthew 2:1-2)

A Verse to Remember:

“God loved the world so much that he gave his only Son.” John 3:16 (ICB)

This folder is designed to give you the ideas you need to teach a unit about Jesus’ birth. Mix and match the activities you want with the stories suggested, and enjoy!

BUY THE DOWNLOAD FOR “Jesus Is God’s Son” $2.99
(sold as downloads only, print not available) Your purchase includes permission to reproduce the pages for ministry purposes at a single location, not for distribution to non-purchasers.

LEARN MORE about the Bible Learning Series

DOWNLOAD the Scope and Sequence for the whole series

Seven Tips for Teaching Three Year-Olds

Let’s look at some basics about three year-olds:

1.  Threes don’t understand the flow of time.
For a three year old, the time from one Sunday to the next seems like an eternity. This age child doesn’t string together, in time order, the Bible stories told from week to week. When you say, “A long time ago, there was a man named Abraham,” the preschool mind interprets it as yesterday. To them, yesterday was a long time ago. So I suggest you tell very simple Bible stories which support a weekly age-appropriate theme. The three year old wrestles with his will versus God’s will (most often in the form of parent or teacher authority), so themes focus on God’s ways: obeying, helping, sharing, and making wise choices.

2.  Threes are self-focused and independent.
Threes are usually somewhat more compliant than twos, and many threes have a desire to please.  However, threes are still quite self-focused. They still assert their independence.  So threes may have a hard time relating with others.

3. Threes learn by doing, imitating, and repeating.
Threes often imitate the significant adults in their lives. If they see parents and caregivers pray and read their Bibles, they will usually imitate them.  If they hear words, rhymes, and songs over and over again, threes often will repeat these words, rhymes, and songs themselves. Threes also learn by touching and doing. So lots of teacher interaction is good. Teachers can model and repeat the important themes of the lessons and guide the children into experiences that enrich their understanding of God’s ways.

4.  Threes are sensitive to music:  melody and rhythm.
A preschooler’s short attention span can often be held and strengthened by songs when the child seems oblivious to spoken words. The simple melodies and rhythms repeated in childhood stay in the heart and mind for a lifetime. So key truths, themes, and verses can be presented not only in spoken words, but also in song.

5. Threes are attracted to sensory experiences and action.
Threes will gravitate toward any place where there is something going on that’s interesting, active, musical, colorful, tasty, or fun to touch or hold.  But occasionally they need someone to draw their attention to these activities. Teachers may find that when they themselves engage in the desired activity and have fun doing it, threes will be drawn in naturally.

6. Threes need supervision and help.
Threes need help and/or close supervision as they learn. A teacher-child ratio of one teacher for every five or six three year olds is very important for quality care-giving. When recruiting helpers and teachers, remember that grandparents and teenagers are often overlooked, but can be valuable members of a teaching team.

7.  Threes have a very short attention span.
While some children are more distractible than others, most threes move quickly from one interest to another. They live in the immediate present and will pursue whatever catches their attention. In order to present and guide activities and stories to young children, teachers must catch and hold their attention. Teachers must also be ready to move to a new activity when the children are ready to move on.

Happy Teaching!

59